• HCWP: Hub City’s Literary Hub

    on Feb 14, 19 with No Comments

    Katie P. Sherman On the corner of King and W. Main Street, in a renovated Masonic Temple, you’ll find the home of The Hub City Writers’ Project (HWCP). The building — which houses a coffee shop, bakery, independent bookstore, and the Hub City Press offices — is...

  • Reading period

    We Can’t Wait to See Your Work!

    on Feb 7, 19 with No Comments

    It’s that time again! South 85 Journal is currently reading for our Spring / Summer 2019 issue, which will come out June 15, 2019.   We are seeking fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and visual art. We are especially interested in work that conveys a sense of place,...

  • After A Deep Dive in Writing, Don’t Be...

    on Jan 1, 19 with No Comments

    Andrea Marcusa You’ve just done a deep dive into difficult material: the death of someone dear, a trauma from childhood, a failure that cuts deep. Your editor, professor, and writing colleagues — those carefully honed beta readers — were moved by your work. You were...

  • Pineapple by Roni Rae Robbins

    Finally! The Fall / Winter 2018 Issue!

    on Dec 15, 18 with No Comments

    We know you’ve been waiting for it. The Fall / Winter 2018 issue of South 85 Journal is now available online! Flash Fiction Contest Winners In October, we announced the winners of the 2018 Julia Peterkin Award for Flash Fiction. Now, you can read the stories! • Winner...

  • The Passing Landscape by Ezra Koch

    The Passing Landscape

    on Dec 6, 18 with No Comments

    Ezra Koch “I don’t want a drink,” Camille repeated. “Suit yourself,” Ernest said, and walked the short distance from the couch to the fridge shakily, his high bony hips jimmying side-to-side. Camille felt nauseous. She didn’t ordinarily get motion sickness, but then,...

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  • The R.O.I. of Writing

    on Oct 14, 11 in Blog by with No Comments

    Imagine for a moment that an executive approached you with a job offer: there will be long hours staring over a computer, countless hours of research and reading, loads of letter-writing, mailing, emailing, editing, revising documents to conform to the recipient’s idiosyncratic wishes, networking with peers, professional development demands, travel, public speaking, conferences, teaching, and, of course, producing work. Successful candidates will be confident, inspiring, innovative, relentless, engaged with the world around them, emotionally and intellectually available, curious, inquisitive, and possess a strong backbone as well as the ability to refute or defend a position at a moment’s notice. By the way, there is little to no compensation for this position.

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  • Letting Your Voice Be Heard

    on Oct 11, 11 in Blog by with No Comments

    In the sixth grade, I became friends with a wonderful person—we’ll call her “Alice.”  Alice is gifted with a phenomenal singing voice.  Her mother was part of the music program at our church, and I often heard the personnel there speak with admiration about how lovely Alice’s voice was.  I sat beside Alice in choir for several years, attended the same middle school, high school, and college, even rooming with her for two semesters.  And looking back on all that time we spent together, I can honestly say that I have never heard Alice sing alone.  In the choir room, with fifty other voices, yes.  But by herself?  Not once!  I have no doubt that she can do so, and do so magnificently.  Alice is not a prideful person, and those that have heard her sing are surely not all lying.  But the truth is that Alice refuses to sing solo for just about anyone.  I’ve always thought it was a shame. 

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  • My Story (and Other Bad Ideas)

    on Oct 6, 11 in Blog by with No Comments

    After a good hour of typing away at my blog entry for this week, I clicked “Save” only to have it vanish into cyber-nothingness before my eyes.  After the initial fury subsided, I was left with a queasy “maybe-somebody’s-trying-to-tell-me-something” feeling.  While my blog-thoughts weren’t exactly original, they were what I’ve been pondering this week, but with my confidence shaken by the fateful “Invalid Entry” (the computer’s words, not mine), I’ll share only an abbreviated version of my original post.

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  • Reflection and Shadow: The Nature of the Artist’s Reality

    on Sep 26, 11 in Blog by with No Comments

    South85 is honored to introduce our very first guest blogger. Rick Mulkey is the director of the low-residency MFA Creative Writing program and the BFA Writing program at Converse College in Spartanburg, SC. He is the author of four collections of poetry, including Toward Any Darkness and Before the Age of Reason.

     

    Michio Kaku–”The mind of God is music resonating through ten dimensional hyperspace.”

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  • A Few Thoughts on Words

    on Sep 18, 11 in Blog by with No Comments

    I guess you could say some are born to write.

    As a child, when other kids were outside playing kickball, I was holed up in some corner of the house reading the dictionary. Yes, reading the dictionary.

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