• 5 am writers club

    The 5 a.m. Writer’s Club

    on Sep 20, 18 with No Comments

    Penny Zang Wilcox 5 a.m. Morning shocks itself into focus, the sky coffee-dark and thick with silence. The hopeful kind.  I am a 5 a.m. writer. Judging from others’ faces when I tell them how early I wake up each morning, on purpose, I must be a masochist. The question of...

  • Dallas Woodburn

    The Short Way Home: An Interview with Dallas...

    on Jul 19, 18 with No Comments

    Mel Sherrer This month, South 85 Journal sat down with Dallas Woodburn, author of the newly released Woman, Running Late, in a Dress, to discuss the nature of short stories, character relatability, the role of irony, and much more. S85: Firstly, why short stories for this...

  • That Ticking Clock: The Handling of Time in...

    on Jun 28, 18 with No Comments

    Cary Holladay As an element of craft, time is generally regarded as a tool of setting, akin to place. Yet it is multidimensional, a voyage through past and future. Equally mysterious is the present, deemed by T.S. Eliot “the still point of the turning world.” First, a true...

  • Summer Flash Fiction Contest $500 prize

    Summer Flash Fiction Contest

    on Jun 25, 18 with No Comments

    South 85 Journal is relaunching Converse College MFA program’s Julia Peterkin awards, starting with an all-new summer flash fiction contest. Like past awards, the contest will honor Julia Peterkin, an 1896 graduate of Converse College. In 1929, she won the Pulitzer Prize...

  • Photograph by William Crawford

    The Spring / Summer 2018 Issue Is Here!

    on Jun 15, 18 with No Comments

    The Spring / Summer 2018 Issue of South 85 Journal is now available online. Creative Work We are pleased to present work by the following contributors: • Artwork – Roger Camp, Richard Corso, William C. Crawford, Ann Schlotzhauer, Louis Staeble, Mauricio Paz Viola, and...

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  • One Magician Watching Another Magician Doing Magic

    on Oct 27, 11 in Blog by with No Comments

    Some time after I started seriously writing and studying the craft, I noticed I was having trouble really enjoying movies or getting caught up in the mystery and marvel of a book or a story. Throughout the entire experience, I realized that I had successfully plotted every event, character interaction, and motivation into a graph-like form in my head. It felt a bit like blasphemy, turning an artistic experience into a quasi-math. Yet, for better or worse, my head was full of quantifiable plot lines and character-arcs and dialogue patterns and motifs and symbols. Even watching plot based commercials was becoming exhausting.

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  • The R.O.I. of Writing

    on Oct 14, 11 in Blog by with No Comments

    Imagine for a moment that an executive approached you with a job offer: there will be long hours staring over a computer, countless hours of research and reading, loads of letter-writing, mailing, emailing, editing, revising documents to conform to the recipient’s idiosyncratic wishes, networking with peers, professional development demands, travel, public speaking, conferences, teaching, and, of course, producing work. Successful candidates will be confident, inspiring, innovative, relentless, engaged with the world around them, emotionally and intellectually available, curious, inquisitive, and possess a strong backbone as well as the ability to refute or defend a position at a moment’s notice. By the way, there is little to no compensation for this position.

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  • Letting Your Voice Be Heard

    on Oct 11, 11 in Blog by with No Comments

    In the sixth grade, I became friends with a wonderful person—we’ll call her “Alice.”  Alice is gifted with a phenomenal singing voice.  Her mother was part of the music program at our church, and I often heard the personnel there speak with admiration about how lovely Alice’s voice was.  I sat beside Alice in choir for several years, attended the same middle school, high school, and college, even rooming with her for two semesters.  And looking back on all that time we spent together, I can honestly say that I have never heard Alice sing alone.  In the choir room, with fifty other voices, yes.  But by herself?  Not once!  I have no doubt that she can do so, and do so magnificently.  Alice is not a prideful person, and those that have heard her sing are surely not all lying.  But the truth is that Alice refuses to sing solo for just about anyone.  I’ve always thought it was a shame. 

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  • My Story (and Other Bad Ideas)

    on Oct 6, 11 in Blog by with No Comments

    After a good hour of typing away at my blog entry for this week, I clicked “Save” only to have it vanish into cyber-nothingness before my eyes.  After the initial fury subsided, I was left with a queasy “maybe-somebody’s-trying-to-tell-me-something” feeling.  While my blog-thoughts weren’t exactly original, they were what I’ve been pondering this week, but with my confidence shaken by the fateful “Invalid Entry” (the computer’s words, not mine), I’ll share only an abbreviated version of my original post.

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  • Reflection and Shadow: The Nature of the Artist’s Reality

    on Sep 26, 11 in Blog by with No Comments

    South85 is honored to introduce our very first guest blogger. Rick Mulkey is the director of the low-residency MFA Creative Writing program and the BFA Writing program at Converse College in Spartanburg, SC. He is the author of four collections of poetry, including Toward Any Darkness and Before the Age of Reason.

     

    Michio Kaku–”The mind of God is music resonating through ten dimensional hyperspace.”

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